Philippine Cuisine

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MECHADO RECIPES

4 Apr 2011

Mechado is a beef dish from the Philippines. The addition of soy sauce and calamansi juice to the marinating liquid gives this recipe its distinct Filipino character.

http://www.balitapinoy.net/images/mechado.jpg

The traditional dish...

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Tags: bay_leaf, beef, beef_dish, beef_tongue, black_pepper, braised, calamansi_juice, crushed_garlic, filipino, lard, larded_beef, lengua_mechada, marinade, marinated_in_vinegar, mechado, onion_slices, philippines, pork_back, soy_sauce, tomato_sauce


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Filipino recipes: New feature starts in Balita Pinoy

2 Apr 2011

Balita Pinoy rolls out a new feature this week, that of video recipes of Filipino food.

This will give both Filipinos and those interested in Filipino food the ability to see...

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Tags: adobo, adobong_mani, afritada, babad_binabad_ibinabad, caldereta, cocidos, crispy_pata, filipino_food_recipes, hamonado, inadobo, kaldereta, kare-kare, lechn, longganisa, lumpia, meamechado, noodles, pancit, papaellas, peanut_adobo, philippine_cuisine, philippine_fiestas, philippines_cooking, pochero, sinigang, soy_sauce, tapa, torta, viands, wok


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PANCIT/PANSIT RECIPES

1 Apr 2011

Pancit or pansit is the term for noodles in Filipino cuisine. Noodles were introduced into the Philippines by the Chinese and have since been adopted into local cuisine.

http://www.balitapinoy.net/images/pancit_palabok_bingbing_qc.jpg 

The...

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Tags: bihon, cabbage, chinese_cuisine, chinese_sausage, chopped_vegetables, citrus, filipino_cuisine, filipino_supermarket, hokkien, noodles, pancit, pancit_bihon, pancit_recipes, panciterias, pansit, pansit_recipes, patis, philippines, pian_i_sit, rice_noodles, sliced_meat, soy_sauce


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ADOBO RECIPES

http://www.balitapinoy.net/images/adobo_chicken.jpg

Adobo is the name of a popular dish and cooking process in Philippine cuisine that involves meat or seafood marinated in a sauce of vinegar and garlic, browned in oil,...

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Tags: adobo, adobo_recipes, bay_leaf, black_peppercorns, crushed_garlic, filipino_recipes, filipino_stew, garlic, marinade, philippine_cuisine, soy_sauce, vinegar


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KARE-KARE RECIPES

4 Apr 2011

Kare-kare is a Philippine stew. It is made from peanut sauce with a variety of vegetables, oxtail (mainly), beef, and occasionally offal or tripe.

http://www.balitapinoy.net/images/kare-kare.jpg

Meat variants may include goat meat...

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Tags: bagoong, bagoong_alamang, beef, calamansi_juice, chicken, chili, chinese_cabbage, comfort_food, eggplant, filipino_american, filipino_fiesta, filipinos, goat_meat, ground_roasted_peanuts, kare-kare, offal, overseas_filipino, oxtail, pampanga, peanut_butter, peanut_sauce, pechay, philippine_stew, philippines, sauteed_salted_shrimp_paste, shrimp_paste, spiced_with_chili, stewed_oxtail, string_beans, sulu, tawi-tawi, tripe, vegetables


Posted at: 02:47 PM | 0 Comments | Add Comment | Permalink RSS | Digg! | del.icio.usdel.icio.us

Filipino recipes: New feature starts in Balita Pinoy

2 Apr 2011

Balita Pinoy rolls out a new feature this week, that of video recipes of Filipino food.

This will give both Filipinos and those interested in Filipino food the ability to see...

[More]

Tags: adobo, adobong_mani, afritada, babad_binabad_ibinabad, caldereta, cocidos, crispy_pata, filipino_food_recipes, hamonado, inadobo, kaldereta, kare-kare, lechn, longganisa, lumpia, meamechado, noodles, pancit, papaellas, peanut_adobo, philippine_cuisine, philippine_fiestas, philippines_cooking, pochero, sinigang, soy_sauce, tapa, torta, viands, wok


Posted at: 03:37 AM | 0 Comments | Add Comment | Permalink RSS | Digg! | del.icio.usdel.icio.us

Philippine Cuisine: The Basics
25 Oct 2011

Philippine cuisine consists of the foods, preparation methods and eating customs found in the Philippines. The style of cooking and the foods associated with it have evolved over several centuries from its Austronesian/Malay origins to a mixed cuisine with many Hispanic, Chinese, American, and other Asian influences adapted to indigenous ingredients and the local palate.

Dishes range from the very simple, like a meal of fried salted fish and rice, to the elaborate paellas and cocidos created for fiestas. Popular dishes include lechón (whole roasted pig), longganisa (Philippine sausage), tapa (cured beef), torta (omelette), adobo (chicken and/or pork braised in garlic, vinegar, oil and soy sauce, or cooked until dry), kaldereta (meat in tomato sauce stew), mechado (larded beef in soy and tomato sauce), pochero (beef in bananas and tomato sauce), afritada (chicken and/or pork simmered in a tomato sauce with vegetables), kare-kare (oxtail and vegetables cooked in peanut sauce), crispy pata (deep-fried pig's leg), hamonado (pork sweetened in pineapple sauce), sinigang (meat or seafood in sour broth), pancit (noodles), and lumpia (fresh or fried spring rolls).

Malayo-Polynesians during the pre-Hispanic era in the Philippines prepared food by boiling, steaming, or roasting. This ranged from the usual livestock such as kalabaw (water buffaloes), baka (cows), manok (chickens) and baboy (pigs) to various kinds of fish and seafood. In a few places, the broad range of their diet extended to monitor lizards, snakes and locusts.

Filipinos have been cultivating rice since 3200 BC when Austronesian ancestors from the southern China Yunnan Plateau and Taiwan settled in what is now the Philippines. They brought with them rice cultivation and a lot of other various traditions that are used in forms today.

Trade with other Asian nations introduced a number of staples into Philippine cuisine, most notably toyo (soy sauce) and patis (fish sauce), as well as the method of stir-frying and making savory soup bases. Vinegar and spices were used in foods to preserve them.

Spanish settlers brought with them produce from the Americas like chili peppers, tomatoes, corn, potatoes, and the method of sautéing with garlic and onions. Although chili peppers are nowhere as widely used in Filipino cooking compared to much of Southeast Asia, chili leaves are frequently used as a cooking green, again distinct from the cooking of neighbors. Spanish (and Mexican) dishes were eventually incorporated into Philippine cuisine with the more complex dishes usually being prepared for special occasions. Some dishes such as arroz a la valenciana remain largely the same in the Philippine context. Some have been adapted or have come to take on a slightly or significantly different meaning. Arroz a la cubana served in the Philippines usually includes ground beef picadillo. Philippine longganisa despite its name is more akin to chorizo than Spanish longaniza. Morcon is likely to refer to a beef roulade dish not the bulbous specialty Spanish sausage.

While there were some Chinese in the Philippines before the Spanish, a significant Chinese population grew only after the Spanish established themselves. Chinese food became a staple of the panciterias or noodle shops that sprang up in the nineteenth century, but were often marketed with Spanish names. The influence of comida china (Chinese food) is seen in dishes like arroz caldo (congee), morisqueta tostada (an obsolete term for sinangag or fried rice), and chopsuey.

Today, Philippine cuisine continues to evolve as new techniques, styles of cooking, and ingredients find their way into the country. Traditional dishes both simple and elaborate, indigenous and foreign-influenced, are seen as are more current popular international viands and fast food fare.


 

Philippine Cuisine: Characteristics
25 Oct 2011

Filipino cuisine is distinguished by its bold combination of sweet (tamis), sour (asim), and salty (alat) flavors. Filipino palates prefer a sudden influx of flavor, although most dishes are not heavily spiced. While other Asian cuisines may be known for a more subtle delivery and presentation, Filipino cuisine is often delivered all at once in a single presentation.

Counterpoint is a feature in Philippine cuisine. This normally comes in a pairing of something sweet with something salty, and results in surprisingly pleasing combinations. Examples include: champorado (a sweet cocoa rice porridge), being paired with tuyo (salted, sun-dried fish); dinuguan (a savory stew made of pig's blood and innards), paired with puto (sweet, steamed rice cakes); unripe fruits such as mangoes (which are only slightly sweet but very sour), are eaten dipped in salt or bagoong; the use of cheese (which is salty) in sweetcakes (such as bibingka and puto), as well as an ice cream flavoring.

Vinegar is a common ingredient. Adobo is popular not solely for its simplicity and ease of preparation, but also for its ability to be stored for days without spoiling, and even improve in flavor with a day or two of storage. Tinapa is a smoke-cured fish while tuyo, daing, and dangit are corned, sun-dried fish popular because they can last for weeks without spoiling, even without refrigeration.

Cooking and eating in the Philippines has traditionally been an informal and communal affair centered around the family kitchen. Filipinos traditionally eat three main meals a day: agahan or almusal (breakfast), tanghalían (lunch), and hapunan (dinner) plus an afternoon snack called meriénda (also called minandál or minindál). Snacking is normal. Dinner, while still the main meal, is smaller than other countries. Usually, either breakfast or lunch is the largest meal. Food tends to be served all at once and not in courses. Unlike many of their Asian counterparts Filipinos do not eat with chopsticks. Due to Western influence, food is often eaten using flatware-forks, knives, spoons-but the primary pairing of utensils used at a Filipino dining table is that of spoon and fork not knife and fork. The traditional way of eating is with the hands, especially dry dishes such as inihaw or prito. The diner will take a bite of the main dish, then eat rice pressed together with his fingers. This practice, known as kamayan, is rarely seen in urbanized areas. However, Filipinos tend to feel the spirit of kamayan when eating amidst nature during out of town trips, beach vacations, and town fiestas.



Philippine Cuisine: History
25 Oct 2011

The Philippine Islands became a Spanish colony during the 16th century; they were ceded to the US in 1898 following the Spanish-American War which then led to the Philippine-American War with the result that the Philippines then became a US colony.

In 1935 the Philippines became a self-governing commonwealth in preparation for full independence. Manuel Quezon was elected president and was tasked with preparing the country for independence after a 10-year transition period.

However, this was interrupted when in 1942 the islands fell under Japanese invasion during World War II.

On 4 July 1946 the Republic of the Philippines attained its independence.

These were not the only foreign influences on Philippine cuisine, prior to the Spanish invasion and colonization, Arab traders had paid visits to the islands bringing both trade and Islam as well as their food culture.

All in all, the Philippines has evolved a mish-mash of cooking which does not have a single distinctive feature. The foreign influences are added to by the fact that the country is an archipeligo with even separate cuisine in different parts of the two main islands of Luzon and Mindanao.

This then gives the Philippines a special type of cuisine, with many different methods of cooking as well as ingredients.